Heavy Metal Britannia

This is another of the Britannia series of documentaries, the previous one I watched was Synth Britannia, which I wrote about a couple of posts back.

In this we follow heavy metal from it’s very early beginnings in England with bands like Budgie, Deep Purple, and of course Black Sabbath. There are plenty of interviews with many people including Tony Iommi, Geezer Butler, Rob Halford, Bruce Dickinson, Lemmy, and Ozzy. And there is plenty of interesting footage and photos.

I learned a few interesting things such as how the term “heavy metal” was coined by William H. Burroughs in his “Naked Lunch” book. Steppenwolf then used it in their song “Born To Be Wild”. However, to check the story on the interwebs I came up with this article which tells a different and not conclusive tale.

I also learned that it was Judas Priest who started the whole leather, gun belts, and plenty-of-studs look that defined how a heavy metal band should look. And I learned that many of these heavy metal chaps are quite nice fellows who just love what they do…always the best way to be. Rob Halford is a very likeable fellow, and Ozzy is just plain funny.

Rob Halford

Definitely a must-watch for metal fans, and an education for those who know little about one of the happiest forms of music there is (I can attest to that).

Date watched: October 28th
Score: 9/10
Film count 2018: 71

Synth Britannia

This is a BBC documentary about the rise of synth music in Britain. It features band members from pioneering bands such as OMD, The Normal, Depeche Mode, Pet Shop Boys, New Order, and Throbbing Gristle, as well as Wolfgang Flür (ex-member of Kraftwerk).

Synth music was introduced to England because of Kraftwerk, and from there synth music battled to become accepted for quite some time until Gary Numan came along and after his big success with Cars the record companies started to notice (that they could make money).

I was surprised at just how much good synth equipment cost back in the early seventies, one particular synth machine was said to cost the same as a small house. A musician that was interviewed had to choose between buying a car to get his driver’s licence, or buying a synth, and of course he chose the synth and said to this day he still cannot drive. They were mostly poor musicians too, Depeche Mode said they had to carry their synths on the train to get to their first Top of the Pops performance…synths are very heavy of course. Depeche Mode are all filthy rich guys now.

The documentary itself was well made, true of any BBC documentary. The interviews were all interesting, and there was plenty of great archive footage. The story had a narrator, but it was mostly told by the musicians themselves.

The Golden Age of British synth ended in the 90’s due to over-commercialisation and the resurgence of guitar music. The final words in the film from Andy McCluskey of OMD sum it up quite well and amusingly (click on the link).

Electronic music these days is alive and well, I enjoy listening to The Chemical Brothers, Buck Futtons, Fatboy Slim, and Aphex Twin. Still, I have good memories of synth music in the 80’s, even if I wasn’t huge fan at the time.

Recommended watching if you like a bit of music history. It would also help if you are familiar with most of the bands.

Watch it here.

Date watched: October 27th
Score: 9/10
Film count 2018: 69