Edge Of Tomorrow

Looking through Amazon Prime last night I came across this. The title of this film in Japan is “All You Need Is Kill”, which is the name of the Japanese story this was based on, so I thought I had not seen it until a few minutes in. But, I felt like a silly science fiction/action film, and it has The Cruiser, so I was more than happy to watch it again.

I last saw this in 2015, and I had forgotten quite a lot of it, so that was good. Here is some of what I said about it last time:

Tom Cruise is usually a good bet these days, his films are entertaining, don’t require any brain power, and have plenty of action. This one also had a few funny bits which Tom carried out well. The story, which is based on a Japanese novel is pretty good although it is just a futuristic action version of Groundhog Day. The CG was fabs, especially the aliens. Bill Paxton was in this, he has been annoying in some films in the past, but I thought he was good in this and he did some good comedy bits.

I totally agree with myself on all counts. Jolly good fun.

Date watched: September 16th
Score: 9/10
Tommo score: 9/10
Film count 2018: 58

Hana-bi

After watching Takeshi Kitano’s disappointing Ryuzo and the Seven Henchmen a few weeks ago I decided last night to watch this film which I knew is considered one of his best films.

And it turned out to be but everything, a most enjoyable and often funny film.

Actually, it was a strange mix of quite graphic violence mixed with touching drama, kind of a cross between Pulp Fiction and Terms of Endearment, but all in Japanese of course. Like Pulp Fiction the timeline jumped around a bit.

The story was very simple, basically about a police detective who had to retire after a shooting which killed one of his partners and injured two others, and he had to take care of his wife who had leukemia. Dialogue was at a minimum with Takeshi hardly speaking at all, instead relying on his deadpan face (Kitano lost all movement on the right side of his face in a scooter accident in 1994) except for a facial tick which was either intentional or not, but which was most effective. The story was ambiguous at times, leaving small details out so that the viewer had to figure them out. There were no close-up shots inserted of someone secretly picking something up or whatever, put there to spell things out for the audience…something I hate seeing in films.

There were many long takes of random things which did not have any meaning except to give the film a very calming effect. One shot had two guys discussing something, then they walked out of view and the camera was just looking at a wall for a few seconds.

One of the characters in the film, a cop who lost the use of his legs in the aforementioned shooting, started up painting abstract pictures such as the following…

There were several of them in the film, and as it turns out they were all painted by Kitano himself. Quite a guy.

Kitano had made several films before this one, but after this film won critical acclaim in Europe it was only then that he was taken seriously in Japan as a film-maker. From Wikipedia:

Kitano himself said it was not until he won the Golden Lion that he was accepted as a serious director in his native Japan; prior his films were looked at as just the hobby of a famous comedian.

An excellent film, well worth a watch, and it was interesting to see 1997 Japan (I arrived in Japan the next year).

Date watched: July 28th
Score: 9/10
Film count 2018: 48

Sophie Scholl

This is German film based on a true story about three student resistance group members caught in Nazi Germany for distributing anti-Nazi leaflets.

It is gripping stuff from start to end and had superb performances, especially from the leading actress who unsurprisingly received the award for best actress at various European award ceremonies. Everything else about it was just as good, I can’t really think of any criticisms at all.

The court scene where Sophie, her brother, and a friend were tried was a fantastic scene, it showed just how twisted and sick the Nazis were. I was reading about the judge in that trial, and he was a seriously evil man who met his fate in the last year of the war when his courtroom was bombed, although it would have been preferable if he was himself tried in front of the allies after the war.

The very last scene was brief but utterly depressing and shocking, I wasn’t expecting it.

Sophie Scholl is now a national hero in Germany, and was voted as the fourth most important German of all time.

A hard film to watch, but worth it nonetheless.

Date watched: April 13th
Score: 9/10
Film count 2018: 28

Star Wars: Rogue One

James and I wanted to see this again after seeing at the film theatre last yaer.

The best thing to do would be to read my first review as it all still holds true.

Briefly though, it is a fantastic addition to the Star Wars universe, entertaining from beginning to end, and the short scene of Darth Vader going berzerb with his lightsaber is most excellent.

Date watched: March 31st
Score: 9/10
Film count 2018: 26

Arrival

This is a film I have been looking forward to watching as I like films about aliens visiting Earth to tell us of their superior ways, or to kill us.

Right from the start to the end this was an excellent story of a woman put in charge of trying to figure out an alien language, and to ask them what it is they want with us inferior beings. Amy Adams and Jeremy Renner were both excellent in their roles. And I liked the aliens and their spaceship, I thought they were very well done.

I could complain that the story used the usual idea that the military always gets involved in alien visitations, resulting in them just itching to start shootin’ when they don’t get results quick enough, even though the science boffins think they can communicate with the aliens with more time. But, this whole premise was central to the story, so I am not complaining.

Personally, I am of the opinion that aliens do not visit Earth, and probably never have. The distances they would need to get here are immense, and even if they could travel at the speed of light it would still take a very long time to get here. And don’t get me started on anal probes.

Date watched: March 23rd
Score: 9/10
Film count 2018: 24

A DECADE UNDER THE INFLUENCE

I last watched this back in 2012, but decided to watch it again as it is a very good documentary about movie-making.

It starts off in the late sixties when films were made big and starred The Kirkster amongst others, then moves onto the seventies when new directors started experimenting and made films that were about real people and real life. By the end of the seventies they were making films like Star Wars and Jaws, pure escapism and more uplifting. It was quite a decade really.

There are interviews with people like Francis Ford Coppola, Bruce Dern, Julie Christie, Roger Corman, Sydney Pollack, Peter Bogdanovich, and Dennis Hopper.

I have seen many of the films mentioned, but there are just as many that I have not seen, so I am going to seek some of them out.

A very good watch if you like a bit of film history.

Date watched: February 8th
Score: 9/10
Film count 2018: 11

George Harrison: Living in the Material World

This is a 208 minute documentary about George and his life before, during, and after The Beatles.

And despite the long running time it is interesting all the way through (although I did watch this in three sessions). There is plenty of archival footage, a lot of which I have never seen before, interviews with several people including Paul, Ringo (very funny at times), Eric Clapton, his wife Olivia, Ravi Shankar, Phil Spector (before he went to prison), Jane Birkin, Patty Boyd, Eric Idle, Tom Petty, and plenty more.

A lot of the film looked at his spiritual beliefs and how it made it’s way into his music. There were various interviews with him and he seemed like a very decent chap, very down to earth, and bit of a rebel in some ways. Just the like the other Beatles he got a bit annoyed with the others towards the end and was just as tired as being a Beatle as the others, although it seems later in life he missed his fab four days.

Nothing was mentioned about his plagiarism problem with “My Sweet Lord” even though they did spend some time on the song. It seems he genuinely did not intentionally copy the original song “He’s So Fine” by The Chiffons, at least not consciously, but the similarities are obvious.

So this is a very worthwhile watch for Gerorge fans, and Beatles fans.

Date watched: January 29th and 30th
Score: 9/10
Film count 2018: 8